Watch kids try VR for the first time

From product design to virtual reality

Here is a good story from a Google product manager transitioning into VR development. The core of the mission is the same, but to get you from point A to B there are some interesting things to know.

  • Sketching, is, again, at the core of everything. During any brain dump or design phase, sketching is as fast as it can get. I’ve sketched more in the time I’ve joined this team than I have in my entire career.
  • Any design skills as diverse as they are will be a huge benefit.
  • Photography knowledge will help you because you will interact with concepts such as field of view, depth of field, caustics, exposure and so on. Being able to use light to your advantage has been much valuable to me already.
  • The more you know 3D and tools, the less you will have to learn. It’s pretty obvious but be aware that at some point, you might do architecture, character, props modeling, rigging, UV mapping, texturing, dynamics, particles and so on.
  • Motion design is important. As designers, we know how to work with devices with physical boundaries. VR has none, so it’s a different way of thinking. “How does this element appear and disappear?” will be a redundant question.
  • Python, C#, C++ or any previous coding skills will help you ramp up faster. Prototyping has a big place because of the fundamental need of iterating. This area is so new that you might be one of the first to design a unique kind of interaction. Any recent game engine such as Unity or Unreal engine largely integrates code. There is a large active community in game and VR development with a huge amount of training and resources already.
  • Be prepared to be scared and get ready to embrace the unknown. It’s a new world that evolves every day. Even the biggest industry-leading companies are still trying to figure things out. That’s how it is.

10 Metrics to Track the ROI of UX Efforts

The first 5 are commerce-specific, but the second 5 apply to all products.

  1. Purchase Rate
  2. Total Number of Purchases/Transactions
  3. Average Order Value
  4. Reduced Cart Abandonment Rate
  5. Reduced Calls to Support
  6. Registrations
  7. Click-Through Rate
  8. Time on Site/Engagement
  9. Number of Return Visitors/Return Visitors
  10. Net Promoter Score

More details on MeasuringU.